Meteora – suspended in air

Even though many years have passed, I remember the morning we left for Meteora, the place that impressed me the most in Greece. Luckily I also took notes.

Meteora is a huge rocky complex located in the valley of Thessaly, not far from the Pindus mountains, with centuries old monasteries. Means suspended stones or suspended in the air. The landscapes left me speechless – an imposing rock formation, which seem to float.

Colors of Greece

Before going to the Meteora Monastic Complex we stopped in Zindros. I thought we would reach Meteora right away, but the road to get there is rocky, full of serpentines and I think we spent a few hours on the way.

However, the time passed quickly because I was enchanted by the perfect green landscapes and by the helplessness felt I couldn’t capture in photos the beauty I saw.


The first monastery we entered was Agios Stefanos. When I arrived, I was amazed to see how many buses were there, of all colors and from all over the world. I saw groups of Germans, French, Japanese, English, Italians. To go to the open monastery, Roussanou, we climbed a lot of stairs. We had to take skirts and scarves at the entrance at both.

From the 24 monasteries created between the 12-16th centuries, only 6 are still functioning and can be visited today.

To reach the most important monastery, the Great Meteor (Megalo Metéoro) we got back on the bus, but when we arrived we found out that we couldn’t enter because was already closed. I’m sorry I didn’t see it, but I hope that in a few years I’ll return to this very beautiful place to be able to see what I didn’t see the first time. Likewise Agios Nikolaoou Anapausa – closed.

At least I took a lot of pictures before going back to our hotel in the small town of Kalambaka.

Meteora means suspended stones or suspended in the air.

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